We’ve all dealt with indecision at some point in our lives, especially in a work environment.

The trouble is, indecision comes with a really high price.

Being in limbo, without a clear decision to move forward keeps you stuck, unable to move forward… and yet, it can be really easy to wallow in a pool of decisions left unmade. 

So WHY is it so difficult to make decisions?

Because thinking for ourselves, and making decisions for ourselves is confronting.

It’s so much easier to allow others to make the rules and tell us what to do. Our cultural and family biases often program us to search for and cling to the approval we receive in following the rules. We’ get really used to following the “leader” and doing things correctly. Rarely are we rewarded for making independent decisions and paving our own path. Making independent decisions comes with the potential for embarrassment, failure or some form of punishment.

Religion is a perfect example of this: a lot of people look to other individuals (such as religious leaders) to make decisions for them, rather than making those decisions themselves. Being in a passive role like this may seem easier at first, but is actually quite detrimental to happiness and personal development if it keeps you from from moving forward with confidence.

How can you be happy and confident your actions if you’re never encouraged to choose what creates happiness for you?

That lack of self-assurance translates into your leadership. Specifically, it diminishes your ability to make confident decisions and of course, your colleagues or team members will feel it too. 

When you’re unable to make confident decisions on your own, it undermines and manifests low confidence in every aspect of your life, and other people will pick up on it as well.

People need decisiveness in their managers and business partners.

An assertive, decisive attitude shows that you have confidence in your abilities as well as your choices. It instantly amps up your credibility and trustworthiness.

Indecisiveness, on the other hand, detracts from your credibility, and limits your ability to attract the leadership and partnership opportunities you want most.

So where does indecision stem from?

One of the main contributing factors is analysis paralysis. This  happens when you overthink every aspect and consequence of every possible decision that can be made. It’s like a game of chess in which a player sees hundreds of moves ahead with any play they make, and as such, they have a very tough time making a move at all.

This kind of downward spiral won’t just affect you personally. It will also impact your business, your colleagues and your employees too.

When you spend so much time overthinking things, you waste a lot of time and often don’t come to any decision at all.  Your paralysis keeps everyone else stuck and frustrated in turn, and opportunities pass you and your organization by.

Solid analysis is important before making a choice so your decision is a well-informed one; however, at some point you have to stop analyzing and commit to some direction so you can move forward. At some point you have to cut off all the other options, make a choice and understand that this decision will lead you in the right direction, trusting that this will open up doors for you.

It’s also possible that the direction you choose won’t be the ideal one. You may have to course correct. 

What’s most important is that you take SOME action regardless of what it is.

At times you do have to just make a decision, put plans into action and allow momentum to inform you of what to do next.

So often we’re looking for clarity so that we can make a decision and yet it’s making the decision and that actually creates clarity.

In a situation like this, where you’ve made a decision but soon after it doesn’t feel like the “right” one for you, it’s really important to listen to those feelings and trust your gut instinct. If you can’t trust your own intuition you’ll want to turn to someone you do trust for guidance and reassurance, whether that’s your Guides, or an established Mentor or Life coach, or a your Mastermind partners.

This isn’t a time to ask colleagues or family members about their opinion.  They’re likely to offer biased advice instead of the objective, impartial feedback you’re after.  With colleagues, in particular, you also run the risk of undermining how they view and listen to you in future situations. Sometimes (with less supportive or understanding colleagues) asking for advice to course correct  previous decision can be seen as abdicating personal responsibility or displaying lack of self confidence. These aren’t traits you want to cultivate when in a position of leadership so it’s best to play it safe by asking for advice in a very safe space.

Avoiding this predicament is one of the reasons it’s so crucial to have a coach or mentor to turn to. They can provide a great sounding board for you to work through your decisions while allowing you the space to justify your actions to yourself without judgment or potential backlash. They’re just there to listen.

More importantly, working through your decisions or the consequences that follow with a mentor or coach is like a practice run that makes it easier for you to  justify decision to others when needed.

Finally, when it comes to indecision, the most important thing to keep in mind is that every single decisions is an opportunity to learn and grow. Decisions can always be reversed or course corrected along the way if needed: nothing is really set in stone.

Should you find that you’ve made the “wrong” decision in a given situation, be gentle and compassionate with yourself. Forgive yourself, and then move towards the direction that feels more aligned.  

Remember that once you’re in motion, it’s easy to change direction: it’s taking the first step forward that’s the most difficult.

It’s the Veza 2018 Goal Setting Intention Guide.

This is a special workbook I’ve created for our community (for free) to help you review your year and set intentional goals for the year to come. The first section is all about capturing this year’s accomplishments so I highly recommend downloading it if you’re wanting to talk new salary (or new role) in 2018.

 Download your copy of the Veza 2018 Goal Setting Intention Guide here

p.s. After you grab your copy be sure to join us over in our  private Facebook Community  where we’ll be completing the workbook together and masterminding to create a game plan to magnetize your dream career (with the salary to match) in 2018.